Study: Unemployment Benefits Weaken Economy

Democrats have offered proposals to extend the benefits for long term unemployment that expired at the end of 2013. 

However, new academic research released last week shows that extending unemployment benefits is a net economic drag.  This could strengthen the conservative case against extending those benefits at the federal level.

The new study supports Senator Rand Paul’s position on unemployment benefits.  Paul is interviewed by Steve Malzberg.  Lachlan Markay of Washington Free Beacon has the story.
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New academic research released last week showing that extending unemployment benefits is a net economic drag could strengthen the conservative case against extending those benefits at the federal level.

The new study supports Rand Paul’s position on unemployment benefits.  Paul talks with Steve Malzberg about his proposed program.

Congress allowed benefits for the long-term unemployed to expire at the end of 2013 as part of a larger budget deal. Democrats have offered proposals to extend the benefits.

The latest legislation, a 10-month extension with budget offsets, was held up in the Senate on Thursday after Majority Leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.) blocked Republicans from offering amendments.

The liberal case for an extension of benefits for the long-term unemployed rests on the supposed simulative effect of greater disposable income for the unemployed.

Read further information at the break.

Lachlan Markay
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More Vital News

Purdue Cops Throw Student Journalist To Ground, Seize His Camera And Detain Him For Three Hours    New!     This scene is typical of altercations between police and citizens who have a job to do for public or, in this case, a university.

Michael Takeda, a junior at Purdue University, working as a reporter for the university owned paper, is out investigating a shooting on campus.   He enters the Electrical Engineering building and takes a few photos of the surroundings.

Moments later, Takeda is thrown to the ground and stripped of his camera and photo equipment, and told by the police that the taking of photos in not allowed in the buildings on campus.  He is taken to police headquarters, where remains three hours and is questioned incessently.

An official of the Purdue University comes to his aid and explains Takeda’s actions to the police, whereupon the student is free to leave.  The official laughs lightly and says that even campus lawyers don’t know the law regarding picture taking inside of building on campus.

Okay! Done! But who files the lawsuit, when, who is served and on what charge?

No lawsuit?  What kind of an outfit is running Purdue!

Police have to know that police get paid to not make errors, like knocking a student to the ground, taking his equipment and, perhaps, injuring or killing him.

This is not the first time this has happened in the country.  Cops made an error that should not have been made, an error that could have taken a life for no reason what so ever, and walk away.

Do all cops do this?  Certainly not!  But some do.

What is all this insanity about?  Are the cops free to do anything they please, even if it is unlawful and brutal and then simply get away with it?

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Enjoy!

 

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